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-hour -- the british prime minister since a shock wave through the eu, promising a referendum on britain's membership. >> time to cobble together a coalition after the israeli prime minister just scrapes through with an election victory. >> did germany's education minister plagiarize her phd? her university launches an investigation. talk about putting a cap amongst the pigeons a day after german and french leaders pledged to deepen e u's economic and monetary union. the british prime minister has signaled his country could want out. >> in a very -- delayed speech, david cameron said he wants to renegotiate the terms of britain's membership and the referendum, but not until the end of 2017. >> that has rattled london's biggest allies and some investors. more uncertainty and possible of people are not what they have been wishing for. >> kamen said he'd campaigned for es you vote, saying he had won the decisions he had -- the concessions he had campaigned on. >> the move had long been anticipated at home and across the european union. david cameron laid out his vision of britain's future. it is one tha
down the iron curtain and changing the entry into the eu of those countries that lost so many of their use to communism. and contained in this history is the crucial point about britain, about our national character, about our attitude to europe. britain is characterized not just by its independence but above all, by its openness. we have always been a country that reaches out that turns its face to the world that leads the charge in the fight for free trade and against protectionism. this is britain today, as it's always been. independent, yes, but open, too. i never want us to pull up the drawbridge and retreat from the world. i am not a british isolationist. but i do want a better deal for britain. but not just a better deal for britain. i want a better deal for europe, too. so i speak as a british prime minister with a positive vision for the future of the european union. a future in which britain wants, and should want, to play a committed and active part. now, some might then ask, why raise fundamental questions about the future of europe when europe is already in the mi
's freedom we paid our parts for the iron curtain and champ named into the e.u. of those countries that lost so many figures to communists. contained in this history is a crucial point about britain, our natural character, our attitude to europe. britain is characterized, but above all by his openness. we've always been a country that reaches out that leads the charge in the fight for free trade and against protectionism. as today as it's always been. independent, yes, but open to. i never want us to put it to drawbridge and retreat from the world. i'm not a british isolationist, but i want a better deal for britain. i wanted better deal if the fantasy british prime minister for the future of the european union. a future in which wants and should want to play committed an active part. now some might then ask, why raise fundamental questions about the future of europe when europe is already in the midst to be deep crisis. why raise questions about britain's role would support in britain is already so did. there are always choices that they don't raise the difficult questions, but it is essent
in algeria, but experts of his speech have been released. he will say that more of the same in the eu is not enough. he is also expected to demand a renegotiation of britain's membership with the block and then put the new terms to a public referendum. critics say he is pandering to euro skeptics in his own conservative party. for more on britain's relationship with the eu, we spoke to the president of the european parliament and asked first why he was so opposed to prime minister cameron's efforts to reclaim some of the powers london has ceded to brussels. >> i think we would need a stronger euro, but not a divided -- a stronger europe but not a divided europe, and i'm really surprised that britain is not a member of the euro. it would be useful that other countries and britain agreed the charter. we need a deeper integration of europe, and not a distraction of the european union. >> cameron seems headed down this road anyway with the threat of leaving the eu hanging in the background. is that fair? is he holding the eu to ransom? >> that would be really a disaster for great britain,
to replenish endangered fish stocks by setting limits on how much each eu state can catch of what kind of fish, but there's fierce debate over those quotas every year, and there are some types of fish that are not covered by fishing regulations at all -- scallops, for example. the eu says that since shellfish do not migrate, it is up to countries like britain and france to decide for themselves what is sustainable, but now it seems a scallop war is brewing in the english channel of mid resentment over who fishes what and where. >> this coastal town in southwest england has been provided for by fishing. out at sea, the crew of this trawler had a confrontation with french fisherman staking a claim to the scallop beds. captain smith was quite shaken by the experience. >> especially monday morning, 8:00, it all kicked off. i was woken up to be told we were surrounded by french trawlers. it was definitely a premeditated attack. >> the french fisherman film the altercation -- the french fishermen. in total, 40 french trawlers surrounded the five british ones. the standoff threatens to tear out of co
it was a miracle that he had survived. >> we will be back with more news including what the eu is calling it a milestone for europe. >> continuing our coverage rocketeers of friendship between france and germany, but turning away from politics. these pacts are not worth much without real ties. the cultural exchange was an important part of the treaty. >> there is a big french community in berlin. we found out what they think about the ties and the differences between the two countries. >> he came to berlin to do an internship. that was four years ago. the young journalists stayed on to document life in the german capital. his address book is a who's who of berlin. the contact come from his job editing a francophone listing guide, pocket berlin. he says it is great to be french in berlin. people are relaxed and approachable. quite simply, people are very direct. they find it easy to come up and chat. it's easy to talk to people, to make first contact with people here. >> he still spends a lot of time discussing life with his colleagues at the listing guide. most were attracted by the polis
>> today, public disillusionment with the eu is at an all-time high. referendum on europe's future. you're watching al jazeera. a third term for benjamin is in yahoo! with a narrow win forcing the coalition with new sets of rivals. north korea threatens to step up its nuclear program after the u.n. condemns decembers rocket launch. >> a panel on the country's top court could throw out the jail sentence of a french woman serving time for kidnapping. more coming up. >> britain's prime minister says he will let the public decide if they want to stay in the european union if he's reelected. david cameron ended months of speculation by promising a referendum on the question, it he is backing. 2015. however, he said that he prefers britain to stay in member of the you. -- in the -- state a member of the eu. >> i am not a british isolationist. but i want a better deal for britain. but not just for britain, but for europe, too. i speak as a british prime minister with a positive vision for the future of the european union. a future in which britain wants and should want to play a committed
a poll in frons show those in the uk would prefer to leave the eu. we are waiting on the results from italy's latest debt auction. it will be two years of a zero coupon and five years of an italian linked paper. we'll get the results coming up in just a moment. here is a check of the european markets. we have seen them particular to the upside. now with the exception of spain trying to fight back into the green this morning, bolstered basically by the general risk on attitude. perhaps some of the credit flows, some of the equity fund flows boosting stock markets around the world. here is a look at who is leading the index this morning. onte paschi is on the top of the board, up 6.35%. today it's continued to snap back on hopes of.continued investor returnings. asml, elements which help make computer chips is up about 4%. it has been upgraded. it's viewed as a winner here in the mobile phone wars as more continue to shift to that market. sbm offshore, peugeot, tnt express towards top of the pack. at the bottom, it's a different story. down 3.5% o a downgrade, some other companies there
david cameron promises to hold a referendum on the e.u. warning that a concession for the democratic leadership is wafer thin. >> if we don't address these challenges, the danger is that europe will fail and the british people will drift toward the exit. >>> google could light a fire under u.s. markets today as the giant's fourth quarter profits top forecasts on higher ad revenues. >>> and here in davos, bank ceos fight back against regulators in an exclusive cnbc debate, apologizing to scandals of the past but defiant it the role of the industry. >> i think there's so much misinformation out there that's used aggressively by people for their own purposes. we provide a service to you. we make a little money every time we do it. that's what happens. >>> and ceo confidence down for a third year in a row according to a survey here. despite markets hitting multiyear highs with lack of decisions in the u.s. weighing on sentiment. >>> okay, hello and welcome to the start of our coverage from the annual meeting of the world economic forum here in davos. day one of three come. kelly, i could
of there being a straight referendum on being an in/out referendum, part of the eu, not part of the eu, which is mixed from where most people think they are. >> some of the surveys show the people becoming more worried about it and we saw those comments, what's his face, labor leader over the weekend saying that he's walking out of the eurozone. so clearly, he finds that there's political gain to be made from -- >> and then you saw this british train commerce survey, just 26% of them wanted to keep the status quo, right? >> i thought this was extraordinary. i was surprises how low it is. in this survey, when you ask businesses about how much in favor they are of keeping things the same, only 24%. >> 59% wanted a looser relationship with the eurozone. most people would say, we want to stay part of the eu, but we would like to have far less regulation, far less judgments than just have been contemplated from the european court. >> is britain going to be able to say that where they get rid of the regulation and teen the market and all that? >> that's the number one question. >> and we will explo
no interest. >> for the eu, the imf, and the european central bank, which have lone cypress billions of years, it is clear the waste and corruption in the country must end -- which have loaned cypress billions of euros. the troika is also calling for more regulation of credit policies. they say the banks lord separate into taking out dodgy loans. >> one of the factors that contributed to this excess of liquidity in the separate banking sector is the attraction of foreign deposits. at this point in time, the total amount of foreign deposits is more than 21 billion euros, more than gdp. >> most of the money came from russian investors. tens of thousands of them have made cypress their second home. in germany's federal intelligence service, a to says most of their accounts contain laundered money. the cypriot government denies that. now the country is hoping newly discovered gas reserves off the coast will help pay back credit from the eu in a relatively short time. the first contract with energy companies have been signed. while billions are being spent to bail out the banks, many indebted fami
joi proposals to deepen economic integration in the eu. >>> the european debt crisis has revealed rifts between member countries. but merkel and hollande say they hope the celebrations will highlight the e.u.'s ties. >>> and now let's get a check on markets. first taking a look at the currencies, the dollar is lower against the yen as traders are taking profits following the recent advance. the dollar against the yen changing hands at 88.74-76. the u.s. currency was trading at the 89-yen level before the bank of japan announcements. market players see the outcome of the b.o.j. policy meeting as within market expectations. taking a look at the euro against the yen, that's quoted at 118.29-32. let's take a look at stocks now. tokyo share prices are lower. as the yen is gaining ground. the nikkei average trading at 10,651. that is a loss of a little over half a percent from tuesday's close. market sources say investors are selling many stocks but especially export-related issues, and that is due to the yen's strength as well as the fact that the b.o.j.'s measures were almost as antic
, says his country will hold a referendum before the end of 2017. that's on whether to stay in the eu. he announced this amid growing calls to leave the european brock, sparked by the ongoing european debt problems. >> i am not a british isolationist, but i do want a better deal for britain. but not just about a deal for britain. i want a better deal for europe too. so i speak as a british prime minister with a positive vision for the future for the european union, a future in which britain wants and should want to play a committed and active part. >> cameron emphasized that britain should not leave the eu. he insists that staying is the country's best interest. >>> romanian police have arrested three men suspected of stealing paintings by picasso, monet and other greats from a dutch museum last year. the missing works have not been recovered. the three suspects are romanian nationals. they are accused of making off with seven paintings from the museum in rotterdam. the works include pieces by pablo picasso, claude monet, matisse and gogan. the combined values is in the tens of millions o
his criticism of eu integration at the world economic forum in davos. >> gender equality in the united states -- the pentagon lifts its ban on women in front line and combat roles. >> on the chopping block, germany's second-largest bank plans to fire up to 10% of its work force. the european union is at a crossroads, and the british prime minister, david cameron, says if the blockheads towards the centralized political union, then it is not for him and not for britain. >> german chancellor angela merkel has chosen her words very carefully, responding at the world economic forum in davos by voicing conditional optimism as far as europe's future goes. she says that patience is needed for structural reforms to take effect. >> she has also called for more regulation of the finance industry to avoid more turbulence, a point of contention with britain. both agree that competitiveness is the key, but how to go about that is the big question. >> david cameron brought his message with him to the swiss alps. in his address to the world leaders in doubles, he repeated his demands for big changes
a referendum before the end of 2017 on whether to stay in the eu. he announced this amid growing calls to leave the european bloc sparked by the ongoing eurozone debt problems. >> i am not a british isolationist. but i do want a better deal for britain. but not just a better deal for britain. i want a better deal for europe too. so i speak as a british prime minister with a positive vision for the future of the european union. a future in which britain wants and should want to play a committed and active part. >> cameron did emphasize britain should not leave the eu. he insists that staying is in the country's best interests. >>> the japanese government has revised upward its overall assessment of the country's economy for the first time in eight months. the upgrade was due to an improvement in business sentiment stemming from a weaker yen and also higher stock prices. in the monthly report for january released wednesday the government says signs of bottoming out can be seen in some areas of the country's economic activity. that is an improvement from its previous evaluation which stated the ec
to seek a fresh settlement with the eu and then to seek the consent of the british people to that settlement. >> i can confirm that that is exactly what i believe this country should do. it is the right thing for britain, because it is right that we are involved in the single market and are active players in the eu, but there are changes that we would like in our relationship that would be good for britain and good for europe, and because of the changes taking place in the eurozone, which is driving a lot of the change in the european union, there is every opportunity to achieve that settlement and then seek consent for it. >> a colleague of lord marland said, "he likes the foreign travel, leading trade delegations, meeting foreign leaders, but wasn't so keen on the detailed" policy of his new job. hmm, i wonder if the prime minister knows anybody else like that. >> the honorable gentleman had all morning to think of that! it is important that we have ministers in both houses who are linking up with the fastest-growing countries in the world. that is why our exports to chi
because there are so many e.u. trips that i have been on with the bush administration and the obama administration where they blame the united states for bringing down the rest of the world when it comes to its state of the economy. it looks like now things are almost reversed in a way. tell us about your conversation with cameron. >> when i interviewed prime minister cameron here in new york and he was sort of in the lion's den because he had thrown down the gauntlet with this speech about britain's position in the european union. britain is not fully in in terms of it is not part of the eurozone. it doesn't have the euro but in many aspects it is in and it is a full member. united states depends on britain for the very strong role in international affairs. it helps all over the place whether in trying to confront iran, syria and north korea with sanctions and plays a big role whether afghanistan, iraq. david cameron is saying we like our foreign role. we like you and our economic role in the e.u. but we don't want to be a part of your political role. he is trying to negotiate a ha
.k., the british finance minister, george osbo e osborne, wants the e.u. to toughen bank regulation across the 27 member states. britain's set plans in motion to separate retail investment decisions in part on proposals from the finnish central bank governor. the fed is also reportedly considering a plan to help banks avoid costly regulations aimed at preventing derivatives trading from being subsidized by taxpayers. the "financial times" says it stems from the lincoln amendment, included in the 2010 dodd-frank law. it prohibits banks that have access to federal deposit insurance or fed credit from acting as derivatives dealers. u.s. banks will still be able to trade some products like interest rate swaps. under the rule, foreign banks would be forced to move their u.s. derivatives activities off their books. >> yeah. if you followed that, you get a gold star this morning. it's a tricky one. >> there's a law that means foreign banks will have problems trading derivatives in the united states. >> charlie, any thoughts here? >> you know, it's part of this broad regulatory framework being put in pla
of commons last wednesday, he naswered questions about britain's rule in the eu and they talked was about a helicopter crash. this is just over a half hour. >> i am sure the whole house will wish to join me in paying tribute to reginald walker. it is clear to see he was an outstanding soldier and hugely respected and our deepest sent -- a deep sympathies are with his family and friends at this time. so like to mention helicopter crash in central london display but also central london display but also wish to join in sending our thanks to the emergency services for the rapid and professional response to the situation. mr. speaker, this point i had meetings with ministerial and colleagues and others, and in addition to my duties in the south i will have further such meetings later today. >> for too long many women and especially hard working stay-at-home moms have been penalized by the country's pension system for having interruption to their national insurance contributions. after 13 years when the previous government did nothing -- [shouting] >> does the prime minister think that the anno
. in the house of commons last wednesday, he naswered questions about britain's rule in the eu and they talked about the helicopter crash that killed two people. this is just over half an hour. a way that rewards hard work. >> order. questions to the prime minister. >> number one, mrspeake >> thank you, mr. speaker. i'm sure the whole hous will wish to join me in paying tribute to richard reginald walker, 28 engine regiment, attached to 21 engineer regiment. it is clear to see from the tributes paid that he was outstanding soldier and mutual respect. are deep assemblies are are with his family and his friends at this difficult time. mr. speaker, i would also lik to mention helicopter crash in central london display but also central london display but also wish to join in sending our thanks to the emergency services for the rapid and professional response to the situation. mr. speaker, this point i had meetings with ministerial and colleagues and others, and in addition to my duties in the south i will have further ch meetings later today. >> for too long many women and especially ard working s
eu joins us from beijing with more of the details. eunice, there have been questions about china's reliability in data. over the past couple of years. >> there's always a big question about that. in fact, goldman sachs and ubs were some of the brokerages that came out recently questioning the latest december numbers for the export figures. they were concerned that the export numbers reported by china didn't seem to match the export data from its trading partners and the slow at some of the ports. that was raising questions. the chinese officials came out and defended the numbers and said that the numbers were all well and good. there is so much skepticism about that. the trade data was looking as though it was very much in flux. however, when you take a look at those in isolation, it raises a lot of question marks. but in terms of going forward, how you read these data points, most economists say you have to look at them as guidelines. this is a developing economy. so in terms of guidelines, the latest figures that we saw for 2012 in terms of gdp or for industrial output and ever
results in europe look set for a change. the eu muniea explains his investigation into the search engine. he's convinced google is profiting by diverting internet traffic for certain businesses. >>> american skres announced better-than-expected earnings for the fourth quarter. it saw revenues of $8.4 had billion. it will make big restructuring changes which includes 5,400 job cuts throughout the quarter. shares dipped in extended hours of trading the. >>> and the fate of superman remains firmly with warner brothers and dc comics after a decision from a california court. the court of appeals said that the rights for the man of appeals should not stay with the cocreators. the decision means that warner can release this summer's new superman reboot without fear of legal challenges. so we're watching today. who is your favorite hee roar? superman, ironman, super mario draghi? whoever you like, e-mail us, tweet us. my produces asked me who i thought my favorite super hero was. it took my a while to think about it, but then i thought hong kong fooey. there you go. many happy memories. talking
britain should leave the e.u. and what that would mean. that has a lot of people talking here about the implications for the u.k., for europe. whether -- we had this big discussion about new york versus london. what happens to the banking system. what happens to the financial? that is the u.k. that's become a big i issue. let's bring in a good friend, as i said, of "squawk." bob hormatz, you know him well. a new -- not a fancy new title, but you're the under secretary of state for economic growth, energy, and the environment. that changed a year ago? >> yes, we tried to pull these together. increasingly what happens in the economy has an impact on the environment. environmental issues and energy issues are increasingly intertwined. >> always big in davos. and david cameron, it has an impact on the global economy if this were to go forward. the chances of it going forward i think are small. he has to get re-elected in 2015 to propose the up or down vote in 2017. it does put a cloud over the u.k. and e.u. a bit. >> the u.s. view has been not to get involved in u.s. politics. the u.s.
as the eu politics are, they're on their way to unified banking regulation in the eurozone. their crisis fund has stabilized. it's not going to be pretty and it's going to take a couple of years still, but we are on our way to a stronger and more unified eu, with or without britain over time. >> what do you think? >> a little bit too positive to me. i would say europe is probably not coming apart. different said statement than europe is coming together. i think the reason it probably won't come apart is greece, not france. sooner or later, that is the real test. the president of france is taking france in directions that are truly unsustainable economically. but for germany, it's one thing if greece were to leave, but for france, it can't leave. if you're germany, that's the whole core, the whole concept, the dynamic of post-world war ii european integration. germany will go to great lengths, i think really whatever lengths it takes to keep france in. europe will survive but economic growth is not going to take off, it's still going to be extremely weak because it doesn't have in place a
the bailout. that was an incredible show of will. halting and clumsy and awkward as the eu politics are, they're on the way to banking regulation in the euro zone. it's not going to be pretty and it's going to take a couple years still, but we are on our way to a stronger and more unified eu with or without britain over time. >> what do you think? >> too positive to me. europe is probably not coming apart. different said statement than europe is coming together. the reason it probably won't come together is not greece, it's france. sooner or later, that is the real test. the president of france is taking france in directions that are truly unsustainable economically. france can't leave if you're germany because that's the whole core, the whole dynamic. the relationship. germany will go to great lengths, really, whatever lengths it takes to keep france in. europe will survive but economic growth is not going to take off, still extremely weak because it doesn't have in place any of the prerequisites. >> the head of morgan stanley had a piece where he said that europe is actually going to bounce
%, the transport budget by 15% and the police budget by 20%, how can we even be giving up on a cut in the e.u. budget before the negotiations have begun? >> we have to make cuts in budgets, because we're dealing with a record debt and deficit. but if he wants to talk about consistency, perhaps he can explain why his own members of the european parliament voted against the budget freeze that we achieved last year? perhaps he can explain why the socialist group in the european parliament that he's such a proud member of are calling not for an increase in the budget, not for a freeze in the budget, but for a 200 billion euro increase in the budget? and while they're at it, they want to get rid of the rest of the british rebate. is that his policy? >> the reality is this: he can't convince anyone on europe. last year he announced out of the december negotiations with a veto and the agreement went ahead anyway. you've thrown in the towel even before these negotiations have begun. he can't convince european leaders, he can't even convince his own back benchers. he is weak abroad, he is weak at home
who engage in scare will tell you that our party will come to power, rip up our agreement with the e.u. and take our country out of the eurozone break all of greece's ties with the culture civilized west and turn greece to a new north korea. my dear friends, this is the worst form of scare. my party doesn't want any of these things. we were always and will continue to be a european party. the fact we believe that europe is lost the road, in that it is imposing inhuman policies on it's very people can be considered antieuropean. of our policies have to match the best interest of the people of europe if we were to be considering ourself proeuropean. and the fact that europe is our common home and we have to protect it from the great depression that is spreading and threatening not only use europeans but the entire world economy we want to stop the splintering of europe. that's why we're against today's austerity policies. that's why we are standing against today's european us a austerity policies. i want to say it plainly, when it comes in to power. in greece wealth have one -- we'll hav
by the proposal in today's conservative report to opt out of the eu law. will be prime minister rule out this opt out today? >> what this government has done, explain to him at the beginning of prime minister's question is massively help the women through the single tear pension. i look very carefully at the proposal he mentioned and i will write to him. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i know my right honorable friend is aware of the extreme study suffered in the west country in november and december of last year, impacting many homes and businesses but also sweeping away the rail link between the west country and london leaving us cut off for several days. which he ushered our government will take every step necessary to improve the resilience of this vital rail link so we never get cut off a give? >> i think my honorable friend is right to raise this issue. i'm well aware of how bad the
government's position on britain's role in the eu. he pledged to hold a referendum on britain's future in the eshoo if conservatives win the next election. he took questions from the british house of commons. this is 35 minutes. >> prime minister. >> question number one a, dilma, mr. speaker. -- thank you, mr. speaker. i am sure the whole house will wish to draw any in paying attribute to david robert shaw. he died and queen elizabeth hospital birmingham last wednesday as a result of wounds that he sustained in afghanistan. he gave his life for the safety of the british people, and his incredibly great contribution must never be forgotten. our profound condolences are with his loved ones. this morning, i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others, and in addition to my duties in this house i shall have a further meetings today. >> i am sure the whole house and the whole country would want to associate themselves with the prime minister's comments about david robert shaw. on monday, the prime minister stated that the task for our generation was to struggle against terrorism. on
early to say. i think the eu has taken action, the situation is much more stabilized, uncertainties have reduced. so i think we are on the right path for further growth. >> it's going to be a reasonably good year. if you exclude europe, i would say it's going to be a good year for the industry, but when you include europe, it's going to be exceptionally good. we are looking at the car market with the construction of 8%. we are protecting 3% of construction for 2013. i don't think in europe we are still in the recovery mode. except europe, growth everywhere. >> you see the different twist or europe in particular dpifg more stability. it's about combining different disabilities to reboost growth. >> all right. the final quote there coming back little by little, maria. >> yeah. a big diversified group of executives talking about the environment. joining us right now is the ceo of coca-cola, muhtar. it's great to see you. >> great to see you. >> what do you think? >> well, we continue to see opportunities everywhere in the world, the kind of opportunities are continuing to contract the code
's going to do a referendum on whether or not to keep the uk in the eu. what would be the implications if the eu has left? >> i think we are still quite far from that happening. of course, this announcement of a referendum years from now is creating uncertainty and is not necessarily helpful in terms of stabilizing the economy, neither in the uk or in the european union. >> do you think changes need to be made in terms of policies to encourage the uk to stay? >> in fact, many of the elements or the policy agenda of david cameron are something which are very important and the commission is working for the confidence of european industry, a rather comprehensive free trade agenda as well as the competition of the single market. this beneath for restoration of the european industry and of returning to sustainable growth and better employment. but there is no need to leave the european union for the policy -- >> this morning, as you well know, the foreign affairs and trade, as well, there's quite a lot of support around europe for david cameron's thought process of what he wants to achieve
. defended dialogue with hamas. refused to join in a letter calling on e.u. to condemn hezbollah. he had a pejorative comment to jewish lobby. he has taken stances that indicateed he is less than supportive of the relationship with israel. >> there are two key democrats that could factor in how this goes. one is new york democratic senator schumer. >> he is staying quiet on the fight. talk about the real oppositio opposition. i think there will be some tough hurdles to get over with republicans. but i don't think there is enough democratic fight to stop the nomination. out of loyalty to the president who don't want him appointed will vote for him. >> bret: john kerry, fair to say he has an easy ride? >> yeah. it's an opportunity to get questions answered on benghazi or put it front and center in how the future of the state department will be run. no, i don't think there is any problem with him. >> bret: you agree, carl? >> it's interesting hearing. i agree that the committee means he gets approved but he will be asked about benghazi and about the basic tenets. and he will go on about the
to hopkinson said this water tastes funny and hopkins said of course it does, it's got a whiskey in it. its e.u. a judge of water. last night and then, you know, he would do these things like -- off in odd note to winston churchill essay deerwood then, happy for dave. how old are you anyway? that's the kind of guy he was. there is another dinner at claridge is in the west end of london and period was hosted by the leaders of the british press, the publishers, the editors, the distinguished writers. churchill wasn't there. hopkins was the guest of honor. and so that journalists would do the lake and what he said that he was asked to make some after dinner remarks and he went around the table, speaking softly, looking at a set, shiny and 86. he gave them the sons that while america was not yet in the war, she was marching to save them in the british old. and then one of the journalists wrote, we are happy then all. her courage and confidence have been stimulated by a contact, which shakespearean henry the fifth had a phrase, a little touch of harry mma. the hopkins touches not know, nor was it la
military efforts. >> of the eu have expressed their solidarity, both with mali and the intervention of france. all of my colleagues, without exception, have highlighted the full support the actions of friends and are thankful that france reacted so quickly. to quote the remarks of one of them, "witho, france, there would have been no mali." >> mali gained independence from france in 1960. more than 100 people have reportedly been stabbed, shot, or potentially burned to death by a massacre in the syrian city of homes. the attack in a poor area of the city's edge killed 106 people, some of them children, according to the britain-based syrian observatory for human rights. many homes were set on fire and some of the victims' bodies appeared to have been burned. it was unclear whether the attackers were part of the syrian army or members of a militia loyal to president bashar al-assad. widespread violence was reported thursday across syria, with continued bombings by government planes and clashes between troops and anti-government rebels. the obama administration is continuing its push
states at 1.4, which means for every dollar you cut, you ha you had e lose $1 340eu in gross domestic product. goildman sax, which is not exactly a left-wing outfit has put it close to 1.5. cut $1, lose $1.50 in gross domestic product. economists at the the university of california have found that during recessions -- and it is important -- during recessions, the fiscal multiplier in developed countries generally falls between 1.5 and 2. that complicated economic gobbledygook boils down to this: $1 in reduced government spending will reduce gross domestic product by more than $1 -- by $1 340eu or $1.70 or whatever the multiplier is, and damages the economy without accomplishing the intended deficit reduction. other countries teame attemptedt austerity -- spain, greece, and portugal particularly have persistent double-dynel i think unemployment -- double-digit unemployment, over 126% i 26% in and greece, and they have anemic or negative economic growth rates. contrast that with the u.s. where a more balanced approach to the economic crisis yielded an unemployment rate that is still far
, intergovernmental cooperation destroys responsibility and accountability. look at the e.u.. did the e.u. destroy greece, or did greece destroy the e.u.? it's probably both, but you can't tell, and they all blame each other. and the founders didn't need the e.u. to see these dangers. all of this arises from intergovernmental cooperation and commandeering. the founders didn't need the e.u. because they have the example of commandeering in front of them. it was the articles of confederation. and so they wrote a constitution that prohibits this and makes it very, very difficult in any event. the second objection to justice breyer or, rather, the objection to his second point is, well, if the feds want to send swarms of officers, let them try. as angela already suggested, they can't, and they won't, and if they do, they will have to pay the fiscal and political price. so i think in a weird way it would actually be great if we had fbi agents in santa clara breaking down the doors of gravely-ill pot smokers. that'll tell people more about the federal government than 15 papers from the cato institute. [
saying you're special, but only special if you stay at the heart of the eu. they're under pressure to renegotiation the relationship with brussels. but the u.s. assistant secretary said such a plan would have major consequences. as chairman of the business in europe outlined on cnbc last night. >> we don't want to run the risk of trying to set the bar too high in the sense that there's some fantastic renegotiation we can have where we can cherry pick the bits we like, get rid of the bits we don't, because the chances of that happening are probably close to zero. so we don't want to see any risk in our membership. we want more reform by absolutely we do. we made that very clear in the letter. but we don't want to risk or membership because our membership is responsible for millions of jobs and underpins our future prosperity. >> so that debate is going to em. at the same time, david, you think the pound is going to come under pressure. it's a triple cocktail that's going to undermine it. what is that? >> yeah. that's the idea we had, we were talking last year about europe rate cuts,
that he felt that american television programming certainly appear in the '70 z, '70s, '0eu89d had a positive event demonstrating american vawms to the world. how do you think the world outside the united states show "24" and "homeland" and what effect do you think -- have you heard anything at all? >> yeah. "24" and "homeland" are extraordinarily popular not just in germany and in the u.k. but also in jordon, turkey, and places you, you know, frankly "24" is a huge knit iran. it's being beamed in illegally by i can't remember the name. >> you're not getting paid for it. >> right. i'm not getting paid for it, no. >> but it's smuggled in a lot. yeah. we heard it from -- [inaudible] >> >> yeah. >> and the actor who plays a character is persian and has a lot of connections in iran and he's been tracking . >> butt thing . >> tracking "homeland" in iran. >> and surprise stunningly popular. statement i have read a few criticisms of the show, and again, to the extend we sort of, i think, make piss people off on every side of the aisle and embraced too. tvs a good thing. i think one thing
. if a conservative government is elected in 2015 cameron plans to renegotiate the u.k.'s relationship with the e.u. and allow, british citizens to vote whether or not to stay a part of it. the referendum many have feared. cameron facing criticism from british business leaders and other european leaders as he called for this renegotiation. also sparked concerns from here in the united states. the white house says britain's stronger for being a part of the e you. britain's exit could stifle the economy and trade ties throughout europe. many believe in the u.k. they're not getting anything out of it as they did with the common market. it will make life difficult if they're not a part of the european union because they have to pay more for trade. anyway. interesting to see if it went to vote. i think it would be close. tracy: yeah, right. ashley: that is if the conservatives win in 2015. tracy: you can't still vote. ashley: i can. tracy: how would you vote? ashley: i'm not saying. tracy: we'll find out. quarter after the hour. get down to nicole nicole petallides on the floor of the new york stock exc
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